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Student Spotlight

Lessons from a Family of 17

One of 15 children, Trixie Judd spent much of her childhood helping raise her younger siblings. Now at the BYU Marriott School of Business, Judd feels at home in the strategy program, where leadership, hard work, and close bonds are valued—just as they were growing up.

Trixie Judd poses for a photo on the beach.
Trixie Judd is a student in BYU Marriott's strategic management program.
Photo courtesy of Trixie Judd.

Judd’s childhood provided her with some unique opportunities to cultivate her mentorship abilities. “Because we have such a large family, the older kids would get a ‘buddy’ that you help raise,” Judd explains. “I taught my buddy, my younger brother Blackstone, how to read and write. I absolutely loved learning how to raise children.”

Caring for her siblings provided valuable skills that Judd believes will help her moving forward. Alongside her brothers and sisters, she also learned how to manage her time to prioritize education. “My parents encouraged us to spend our free time learning instead of doing things that suck you into a time vacuum,” Judd adds. “We only watched one episode of television a week, so I read textbooks to understand a topic better when I had free time.” Judd’s motivation for learning helped her transition to college following high school graduation.

Although Judd knew she would miss her family, she looked forward to starting a new chapter at Brigham Young University. “I was so excited to leave California for the next phase of my life and live on my own for the first time,” Judd recalls. “The transition was really seamless, and I looked forward to learning things in school that would benefit me in the long run.”

The Judd family takes a group picture.
Trixie Judd with her parents and siblings.
Photo courtesy of Trixie Judd

Judd excitedly began her coursework in psychology, her original major, before realizing she needed to switch career paths. “I love psychology, but I didn’t want to be graded on it because I wanted to learn about it on my own,” Judd jokes. “I researched psychology on the side, and that kept it fun for me.”

Wanting to find a major that would enhance the skills she gained growing up, Judd began to look for one that taught leadership and organization. That’s how she found the strategy program at BYU Marriott. “I realized a career in business would be where I could use my skills the best and make the most impact,” Judd explains. “I started taking prerequisite courses to apply to the strategy program, and I felt like I was learning about an entirely foreign world, yet I loved it.”

Once Judd was admitted into the program, she began making social connections that only amplified her learning. “My cohort is very involved with one another. It’s pretty small, so you get to know everyone pretty well and have close relationships,” Judd says. Just like she did at home, Judd finds a way to create bonds that are meaningful and beneficial not only with her cohort but also with her professors. She recalls, “Professors Dyer and Lewis were particularly generous with their time, which helped me understand challenging theories and topics.”

Now entering her second year studying strategy, Judd explains, “I’ve always worked as hard as I could to maintain good grades because I never want to fall behind, and I compensate for that with my work ethic,” Judd says. “My motivation to learn and stretch myself are the main reasons I perform well academically, but I would also attribute that to my great teachers.”

Looking forward, Judd will continue to stretch herself mentally and academically with an internship working for Senator Mitt Romney in Washington, DC. “I’ll get to use the skills I’ve learned in the strategy program in the political field,” Judd says. “I think it’s fascinating that one major can be so applicable all over the place.”

Though Judd isn’t sure about her post-graduation career path, she’s become a stronger leader and strategist, which she knows will help her in the workplace and with her family. “The strategy program has been so useful to me because I know I can use the theories in any job,” Judd explains. “I love learning principles, and my time in the program has been all about that.”

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Written by Maggie Olsen

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